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MESSENGER Panelist Biographies

Brian J. Anderson, MESSENGER Deputy Project Scientist
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD

Brian J. Anderson As the deputy project scientist for MESSENGER, Brian J. Anderson oversees the orbital operations planning to ensure that observations from all of the instruments are coordinated to meet the mission objectives. His research areas include the dynamics of space plasmas and planetary magnetic fields. At APL since 1988, he served as Magnetometer Instrument Scientist on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous mission and until recently filled that role on MESSENGER as well.


Contact Information: 240.228.6347
E-mail: brian.anderson@jhuapl.edu

William E. McClintock, MESSENGER Co-Investigator
Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

William McClintock William McClintock, a Senior Research Scientist at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, is an expert in upper planetary atmospheres and specializes in their measurement using ultraviolet spectroscopy. He led the development of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) and is leading the analysis of its measurements of atmospheric composition. He obtained both a BA in physics and a Ph.D. in physics from The Johns Hopkins University. He joined the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in 1977 to develop rocket experiments for observing interstellar matter. He serves as the SORCE SOLSTICE Instrument Scientist. In addition to his SORCE activities, he is a co-Investigator on a number of NASA planetary programs, including the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer Experiment on the Cassini mission to Saturn and the MESSENGER mission. His research interests include the precise measurement of solar and stellar ultraviolet irradiance and ultraviolet observations of planetary atmospheres and exospheres.


Contact Information: 303.492.8407
E-mail: William.McClintock@lasp.colorado.edu

Brett W. Denevi, Staff Scientist
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD

Brett W. Denevi Brett W. Denevi is a Planetary Scientist in the Space Department of The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. Her research focuses on the composition, origin, and evolution of planetary and asteroidal surfaces, including topics such as regolith development, chemical and mineralogic composition of planetary materials as derived from ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectroscopy, and geologic mapping of planetary surfaces. She has extensive experience in sensor calibration and image processing. She is currently working on the calibration and analysis of images from MESSENGER's Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS), and she is a Co-Investigator on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera and a Participating Scientist on the Dawn mission to Vesta. She received her Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from the University of Hawaii.


Contact Information: 240.228.2139
E-mail: brett.denevi@jhuapl.edu

Noam R. Izenberg, Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer Instrument Scientist
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD

Noam R. Izenberg As Instrument Scientist for the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) instrument on MESSENGER, Noam Izenberg is responsible for translating the scientific goals of the instrument team into operations that will net the information required. He has been involved in MESSENGER since his arrival at APL to become a member of the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker team, on which he served as Near Infrared Spectrometer Instrument Scientist. His primary scientific interests focus on the surface morphology, composition, and surface processes of the rocky bodies of the solar system. He has participated in such other missions as Magellan, CONTOUR, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, he has led development projects in chemical and astrobiological sensors for planetary science, and he is experimentally exploring physical processes on low-gravity bodies such as asteroids. Izenberg received an Sc.B. in geology from Brown University and a Ph.D. in earth and planetary sciences from Washington University, St. Louis.


Contact Information: 240.228.7918
E-mail: Noam.Izenberg@jhuapl.edu


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