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NEW SCIENCE FINDINGS FROM MESSENGER'S THIRD MERCURY FLYBY

Date: November 3, 2009, at 1 p.m. EST


Introduction:

MESSENGER successfully flew by Mercury on September 29, 2009, gaining a critical gravity assist that will enable it to enter orbit about Mercury in 2011. During this third and final flyby, the spacecraft captured images of six percent of the planet never before seen, and scientists continue to be surprised by new findings from the planet.



Panelists:

- Sean Solomon, MESSENGER Principal Investigator, The Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, D.C.
- Ronald J. Vervack, Jr., MESSENGER Participating Scientist, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.
- David J. Lawrence, MESSENGER Participating Scientist, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Md.
- Brett Denevi, MESSENGER Imaging Team member and Postdoctoral Researcher, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz..


Resources:

press release   multimedia  
   


Contact Information:

Paulette Campbell
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
Laurel, Maryland
Phone: 240.228.6792

Dwayne Brown
NASA Headquarters
Washington, DC
Phone: 202.358.1726/3895

Tina McDowell
Carnegie Institution of Washington
Washington, DC
Phone: 202.939.1120



Event Information:

The NASA MESSENGER Science Update will take place on Tuesday, November 3, 2009, at 1 p.m. EST. Reporters may ask questions from participating NASA locations. The briefing also will be streamed live on NASA's Web site at: http://www.nasa.gov.


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